Cocina tradicional 2

SPANISH FAMOUS RECIPES

Spanish cuisine is known all over the world, and some of its typical dishes are so popular that if you’re in Spain you can’t pass up the chance to try them. All the recipes we suggest below are so famous you’ll have no problem finding them on the menu in any restaurant. And then you can upload your photos to the Internet to make your friends envious. Remember that these are just a few examples. To see all our recipes, go to the Gastronomy section.

Cocido madrileño (chickpea casserole)

A nice hot cocido, or chickpea casserole, is a pleasure everyone can afford to enjoy. Although there are many kinds of cocidos, the one called cocido madrileño has a traditional way of eating it: You start with a tasty noodle soup, then chickpeas and vegetables, and you finish with meat and sausages. It always goes down well, and particularly in winter.

Gazpacho

This traditional cold soup is typical of several regions in Spain including Extremadura, Andalusia and Castile-La Mancha. The most popular is the Andalusian version, which is made with tomato, peppers and garlic (all finely chopped) among other ingredients. It’s not only healthy (and a perfect example of our Mediterranean diet), it’s also delicious.

Octopus ‘a feira’, ‘sochangre’, with garlic, in a salad.

This list could not fail to include one of the most traditional recipes from the region of Galicia in northwest Spain. Connoisseurs say that it should be served on a wooden plate and sprinkled with a generous pinch of coarse salt, ground red pepper (a spicy touch for the more adventurous) and olive oil. No celebration in Galicia would be complete without it.

Fabada (white bean casserole)

We’re still in northern Spain, although this time in Asturias. After a long morning’s sightseeing, who wouldn’t be tempted by the thought of sitting down at the table and tucking into a hearty plate of ‘fabes’, white beans simmered together with a variety of meats such as black pudding, chorizo, bacon and gammon. It’s guaranteed to revive you.

Paella

There are numerous versions, although many claim that the genuine Valencian paella is made with Valencian rice, chicken, rabbit, snails, ‘garrafó’ (white beans), ‘tabella’ (broad beans), ‘ferradura’ (green beans), garlic, tomato, ground red pepper, olive oil, salt and saffron. Tip: the best way to enjoy it is straight off the fire, sitting at an outdoor terrace on the shores of the Mediterranean.

Spanish omelette

This is regarded as the typical Spanish dish par excellence. You’ll find two schools of thought: those who say the genuine potato omelette should be made without onion, and others who claim this ingredient is the key to a good tortilla. Controversies aside, it definitely has to have eggs and potatoes. There are numerous bars in Spain whose star dish is precisely this. There’s no doubt that it’s absolutely delicious, and we urge you to try it.

Cod ‘al pil-pil’

The Basque Country is famous for its outstanding fish, and that’s why the region has so many seafood recipes like this cod dish. The fish juices, combined with the cook’s skill, produce a delicious emulsified sauce. You can either order it in a restaurant or learn how to make it yourself by attending one of the traditional cookery courses organised in this part of Spain.

Roast lamb

Typical of the cuisine of Castile-León, the traditional method is to roast a milk-fed lamb (‘lechazo’) in a wood-burning oven in an earthenware dish. This produces the golden brown colour that makes it so irresistible. In some areas of Castile-León the lamb is replaced by suckling pig and cooked in the same way. Both dishes are a genuine institution in this area. Don’t leave without trying them.

Churros

These are popular for breakfast or as a snack, usually with thick hot chocolate, or sprinkled with caster sugar. You can also find food stands in the street that sell them freshly made. See how to make this famous Spanish breakfast food at home.

Santiago cake

A delicious sweet sponge cake, flavoured with almonds and decorated with the cross of St. James. This is the best known cake made in Galicia, and a classic purchase for pilgrims who finish St. James’ Way. To see if a Santiago cake is good, check the texture – it should be light and spongy.

Further info : https://www.spain.info/en/

Panoramic view of the port of Malaga, Costa del Sol, Spain

MALAGA Coast of the sun

The Gibralfaro castle casts a watchful eye over this warm-hearted and lively city full of attractive sites such as the Alameda Principal avenue and the La Farola seafront promenade. Its status as the capital of the Costa del Sol has made it one of Spain’s foremost holiday destinations, thanks to its mild climate, its beaches and its outstanding offer of golf courses.

Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, Romans… over 2,000 years ago the most important Mediterranean civilizations found in Malaga an exceptional place in which to establish trade routes, thanks to the strategic location of its port. The Alcazaba (8-11th century) is one of the symbols of the city, and one of the largest Arab fortresses in Andalusia. This building is today the site of the Archaeological Museum, containing valuable pieces dating from Phoenician and Roman times.The Gibralfaro castle (14th century) is linked to the Alcazaba by a section of wall and offers outstanding views over the city, which is open to the sea through its port and the La Farola seafront promenade, one of the city’s main leisure areas. At the foot of the Gibralfaro stands the Roman theatre, the bullring, (known as La Malagueta) and the historic quarter of the city. In the centre stands the Cathedral (16-18th century), also known as ‘La Manquita’ (‘the one-armed’) thanks to its unfinished right tower. This beautiful Renaissance building is home to an interesting series of chapels containing fine examples of Andalusian imagery. In the old part of town there are other interesting churches such as the churches of Santiago 15-18th century), with its beautiful Mudéjar tower, Los Mártires, Sagrado Corazón and Santo Cristo de la Salud.

More info : https://www.spain.info/en/

PAMPLONA, SPAIN - JULY 5: Panoramic view of Plaza del Castillo in July 5, 2013 in Pamplona, Spain. Square is located in the historic part of the city

PAMPLONA : Cuisine and traditions

Cuisine, festivals and the surrounding area The old town is an idea place to sample the delights of the varied Navarre cuisine. In any of its restaurants you can taste the traditional produce of Navarre’s vegetable gardens –asparagus, piquillo peppers, haricot-beans. Roast lamb or lamb cooked with tomatoes and peppers are the classic dishes, accompanied always by a fine wine with the Navarra Designation of Origin and a pacharán (sloe anis liqueur) to finish. If you want to get to know Pamplona and its people in full party mood, you should visit the city during the Sanfermines festivities (6 to 14 July), which have the International Tourist Interest designation. One of the biggest attractions at these festivities in honour of the city’s patron saint is the running of the bulls (a tradition of running in front of the bulls), which mainly takes place on the hill of Santo Domingo, continuing afterwards along Calle Mercaderes street up to the crossroads with Estafeta, which leads to the Bullring. However, in order to take part, you should be fit, take certain precautions, such as only entering at the authorized points, running only one stretch of the route and avoid provoking the bulls.

More info : https://www.spain.info/en/

granada_highlights

GRANADA-WORLD HERITAGE

Granada ( 270.000 inhab. ) is a city for wandering around and dreaming. The narrow streets and spacious gardens are full of religious fervour during the Holy Week of Easter and festivities in the Sacromonte caves. Located at the feet of the Sierra Nevada.

Due to the fact that it was the last Arab kingdom of the Península, it is also a city of great symbolic value. Its heyday came in 1238, when Mohamed Ben Nasar founded the Nazarie Dynasty, till Boabdill el Chico was obliged to hand over Granada to the Catholic Monarchs, who built new civil and religious monuments, and who are themselves buried in its Cathedral.

FOOD AN DRINK :

The Arab heritage is clear in the cuisine :

Beans with ham, alboronia, “papas a lo pobre”, Sacromonte omelette, San Anton stew, lamb with pomegranates and conventual desserts and pastries

DO NOT MISS :

  • The Alhambra & Generalife. ( World Heritage )
  • The Albayzin ( World Heritage )
  • “Las Alpujarras”
  • Sierra Nevada.

Give him alms, woman, because there is nothing as bad as being blind in Granada.

Francisco Icaza

-Mexican Poet-

Cocina tradicional 2

SOME FAMOUS DISHES FROM SPANISH CUISINE

Spanish cuisine is known all over the world, and some of its typical dishes are so popular that if you’re in Spain you can’t pass up the chance to try them. All the dishes we suggest below are so famous you’ll have no problem finding them on the menu in any restaurant. And then you can upload your photos to the Internet to make your friends envious. Remember that these are just a few examples

1 – Cocido madrileño (chickpea casserole)

A nice hot cocido, or chickpea casserole, is a pleasure everyone can afford to enjoy. Although there are many kinds of cocidos, the one called cocido madrileño has a traditional way of eating it: You start with a tasty noodle soup, then chickpeas and vegetables, and you finish with meat and sausages. It always goes down well, and particularly in winter.

2 – Gazpacho

This traditional cold soup is typical of several regions in Spain including Extremadura, Andalusia and Castile-La Mancha. The most popular is the Andalusian version, which is made with tomato, peppers and garlic (all finely chopped) among other ingredients. It’s not only healthy (and a perfect example of our Mediterranean diet), it’s also delicious.

3 – Octopus ‘a feira’, ‘sochangre’, with garlic, in a salad.

This list could not fail to include one of the most traditional recipes from the region of Galicia in northwest Spain. Connoisseurs say that it should be served on a wooden plate and sprinkled with a generous pinch of coarse salt, ground red pepper (a spicy touch for the more adventurous) and olive oil. No celebration in Galicia would be complete without it.

4 – Fabada (white bean casserole)

We’re still in northern Spain, although this time in Asturias. After a long morning’s sightseeing, who wouldn’t be tempted by the thought of sitting down at the table and tucking into a hearty plate of ‘fabes’, white beans simmered together with a variety of meats such as black pudding, chorizo, bacon and gammon. It’s guaranteed to revive you.

5 – Paella

There are numerous versions, although many claim that the genuine Valencian paella is made with Valencian rice, chicken, rabbit, snails, ‘garrafó’ (white beans), ‘tabella’ (broad beans), ‘ferradura’ (green beans), garlic, tomato, ground red pepper, olive oil, salt and saffron. Tip: the best way to enjoy it is straight off the fire, sitting at an outdoor terrace on the shores of the Mediterranean.

6 – Spanish omelette

This is regarded as the typical Spanish dish par excellence. You’ll find two schools of thought: those who say the genuine potato omelette should be made without onion, and others who claim this ingredient is the key to a good tortilla. Controversies aside, it definitely has to have eggs and potatoes. There are numerous bars in Spain whose star dish is precisely this. There’s no doubt that it’s absolutely delicious, and we urge you to try it.

7 – Cod ‘al pil-pil’

The Basque Country is famous for its outstanding fish, and that’s why the region has so many seafood recipes like this cod dish. The fish juices, combined with the cook’s skill, produce a delicious emulsified sauce. You can either order it in a restaurant or learn how to make it yourself by attending one of the traditional cookery courses organised in this part of Spain.

8 – Roast lamb

Typical of the cuisine of Castile-León, the traditional method is to roast a milk-fed lamb (‘lechazo’) in a wood-burning oven in an earthenware dish. This produces the golden brown colour that makes it so irresistible. In some areas of Castile-León the lamb is replaced by suckling pig and cooked in the same way. Both dishes are a genuine institution in this area. Don’t leave without trying them.

9 – Churros

These are popular for breakfast or as a snack, usually with thick hot chocolate, or sprinkled with caster sugar. You can also find food stands in the street that sell them freshly made. See how to make this famous Spanish breakfast food at home.

10 – Santiago cake

A delicious sweet sponge cake, flavoured with almonds and decorated with the cross of St. James. This is the best known cake made in Galicia, and a classic purchase for pilgrims who finish St. James’ Way. To see if a Santiago cake is good, check the texture – it should be light and spongy.

http://www.spain.info/en/

jamon2

BADAJOZ, A PARADISE FOR IBERIAN CURED HAM:

Iberian cured ham is one of the star products of Spanish gastronomy. And one of the best places to savour it is in the area of Badajoz, in Extremadura. Here we suggest ten places throughout this region which are particularly renowned for their Iberian ham. Get ready to enjoy a real treat for your palate!

On your journey to Badajoz, you’ll see that this part of Spain is home to one of the world’s most extensive areas of the typical wooded pasture known as dehesa. This is a landscape dotted with cork oaks, holm oaks and acorns, which provides the ideal conditions for raising pigs. All these characteristics have led to this product being awarded its own special designation of origin label, ‘Dehesa de Extremadura’. If you’d like to taste this flavourful and succulent cured ham and learn the correct way to slice and serve it, we highly recommend that you make a visit to any of the ten places suggested below in the southern mountainous part of the province. All of them have restaurants and shops which are ideal for sampling and purchasing this typically Spanish delicacy. And all ten are close together, so that if you’re there for a few days, you’ll comfortably be able to visit more than one in your own car. You can arrange your itinerary any way you like. Each place is well worth a visit for a whole variety of gastronomic and cultural reasons:

Oliva de la Frontera This is the perfect place to sample excellent ham. Places to visit here include the shrine of Nuestra Señora de la Gracia, the parish church of San Marcos, and the Plaza Mayor square. And if you happen to be there during Easter week, you’ll be able to see the re-enactment of the ‘Living Passion’.

Jerez de los Caballeros This is about 20 kilometres from Oliva de la Frontera. Here you be able to savour delicious plates of Iberian ham and to visit a meat-curing plant. Other delicacies not to be missed include cured pork loin, and the cured sausages known as salchichón and chorizo templario. Other attractions are the Iberian Ham Fair –one of the most important showcases for this product– which takes place in May and features a range of gastronomic events and tasting sessions. Some of the town’s most outstanding monuments are the El Toriñuelo dolmen, the fortress, and the Torre Sangrienta tower dating from the time of the Knights Templar.

Fregenal de la Sierra This village is a little over 20 kilometres from Jerez de los Caballeros and is well known for its cured ham and other similar items. Sites worth visiting include the castle, the bullring and the parish church of Santa María del Castillo. If you travel in the middle of August you be able to enjoy the International Mountain Festival.

Higuera la Real Five kilometres from Fregenal de la Sierra, Higuera la Real is the perfect place to try dishes such as the stew of pig’s trotters, and the type of pâté known as caldillo… A leisurely stroll will take you to the churches of San Bartolomé and Santa Catalina, and the stone known as the ‘Losa de Capote’, with Celtic origins.

Segura de León Another 20 kilometres away is Segura de León, the place to enjoy a dish of delicious wild mushrooms with pork. After a hearty lunch you may want to explore the castle, the parish church of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, the porticoed Town Hall building and the convent of El Cristo de la Reja. If you happen to be there in the second week of September you’ll be able to enjoy the bullfighting festival known as the ‘Capeas’.

Cabeza la Vaca This is about 12 kilometres away from Segura de León and is famous for its Iberian ham, chorizo and cured pork loin. If you decide to visit, bring along your camera to immortalise the administrative monument known as the rolloor picota dating from the 16th century, and the parish church of Nuestra Señora de los Ángeles.

Calera de León Less than 10 kilometres away you’ll come to Calera de León, where you’ll find some excellent cured ham and delicious sausage products. Monuments of interest here include the convent of Santiago, the parish church of Santiago el Mayor and the monastery of Nuestra Señora de Tentudia.

Monesterio The best month to visit Monesterio (seven kilometres further on) is in September, during the ham festival. If you chance to be here at this time you’ll be treated to a delicious sandwich of Iberian cured ham and you’ll be able to visit various curing houses. Other places worth seeing include the parish church of San Pedro Apóstol and the mediaeval ruins of the Las Torres castle.

Fuente de Cantos About 20 kilometres further north lies Fuente de Cantos, also known for its typical lamb stew known as chanfaina. Here you may want to visit the House-Museum of the painter Zurbarán.

Zafra Zafra, the site of the International Cattle Fair, is about 30 kilometres away. In addition to its Iberian ham, other delicacies worth trying are the famous sweets from the convent of the Las Claritas nuns. Its historic-artistic site is home to interesting monuments such as the Alcázar de los Duques de Feria (today a Parador hotel), the collegiate church of La Candelaria, the convents of Santa Clara and Santa Catalina, and the Santiago Hospital.When you travel to this part of Spain it’s also well worth trying some of the other typical dishes such as green asparagus, cardoons, sweetbreads, partridges in olive oil, and rice with turtle dove. You’ll find all the information on the official web pages of the Extremadura and Badajoz tourist boards.

 

http://www.spain.info/en